Wednesday, 20 June 2018

The Star Of Kazan

The Star Of Kazan By Eva Ibbotson
Do you like books that have action, adventure and mystery?
Well this is the book for you.
This book has adventure because it is interesting and exciting.
The Star Of Kazan is a fiction story.


The Star Of Kazan is set in Vienna, in a big and grand house.
This is where the professors and the maids live.
Vienna is a busy city where lots of people live.
The setting changes between the professor's house and Annikas mother’s
house.


Annika has never had a real birthday instead she has a found day.
She was found in a church on a hill and two maids took her in.
Ellie and Sigrid are maids in a grand house.
They can be stern at times but are caring and kind.
Ellie, Sigrid and Annika work for three professors, professor Julius,
professor Emil and professor Gertrude.


Annika grew up to be a good cook and maid.
Annika is a kind and caring girl, she is a good cook and never gives up.  
Her mother came to get her to take her home but then
Annika finds out the truth…


The Star Of Kazan reminds me of friendship because the
characters work together to solve the mystery of Annika’s mother.
It also reminds me of a book called The Dragonfly Pool,
also written by Eva Ibbotson which is about friendship.


The Star Of Kazan is a good book and I recommend this book for children
10-13 years old, because it might be a bit hard for children under the age of ten.
I recommend this book because it has mystery, adventure and action.
It is also interesting and exciting.




Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Gravity

Highlight the main ideas. Summarize these main ideas  in one or two paragraphs
Gravity is a force that attracts all objects towards each other. Gravitational attraction is
greater for more massive objects.
Gravity decreases as distance between the objects increases.
Every object in the Universe is being attracted towards every other object by the force of gravity.
Gravity keeps people on the Earth’s surface.
Gravity keeps the International Space Station in orbit around the Earth.
Gravity keeps the Moon orbiting around the Earth.
Gravity keeps the Earth orbiting around the Sun.Isaac
Newton was the first to come up with the idea that all objects are attracted towards
each other by gravity.

The Moon is 360,000 km from the Earth and only needs to be travelling at 1 km/s to stay in
orbit around the Earth. Any two masses are attracted towards each other by gravity.
This force of gravity causes the Moon to change direction to make it orbit around the Earth.
Gravity doesn’t disappear just because you are above the atmosphere.
Isaac Newton worked out that, if the distance from the centre of the Earth doubles,
gravity becomes a quarter as much as it was on the surface.
As a satellite moves around the Earth in a circular orbit,
the direction of the force of gravity is always towards the centre of the Earth.However
, if the satellite is given speed in any direction horizontal to the surface of the Earth,
it will travel further before it hits the Earth. If it is given enough speed, it will travel so far that,
as it curves towards the Earth, it will miss the Earth altogether.


Close to the Earth at an altitude of 100 km, a satellite needs to be moving at 8 kilometres
per second (28 000 km/h) to stay in orbit. Close to the Earth at an altitude of 100 km, a satellite
needs to be moving at 8 kilometres per second (28 000 km/h) to stay in orbit.
Astronauts appear to be weightless for the same reason that a person
on a trampoline feels weightless when in the air.







When does gravity decrease? Gravity decreases  as the distance between the objects increases.


When does the force of gravity become noticeable? Gravity only becomes noticeable if one or both
 of the objects has a lot of mass, such as the Earth.

Gravity disappears when you are above the atmosphere. True or False? It is true that gravity
disappears when you are above the atmosphere.


According to the text, how long does it take the International Space Station (ISS) to orbit Earth?
It takes about 90
minutes for ISS to orbit Earth.


Who first stated that all objects are attracted towards each other by gravity? Isaac Newton
first stated that all objects are attracted towards each other by gravity.


Find six words in the text that have a suffix.  Noticeable, weightless,  pulling, accepted,
horizontally, gravitation

Gravity

Gravity is a force that attracts all objects towards each other. People are attracted towards

the Earth and the Earth towards people, the Moon and the Earth are attracted towards each

other, and the Sun and the Earth are attracted towards each other. All of these attractions

are caused by gravity. Gravitational attraction is greater for more massive objects. Gravity

decreases as distance between the objects increases.

Gravity attracts all things towards each other

Every object in the Universe is being attracted towards every other object by the force of gravity. This

means that there is nowhere you can go in the Universe where gravity is not acting. Examples of gravity
in action:
Gravity holds the atmosphere in place around the Earth.
Gravity keeps people on the Earth’s surface.
Gravity keeps the International Space Station in orbit around the Earth.
Gravity keeps the Moon orbiting around the Earth.
Gravity keeps the Earth orbiting around the Sun.
Isaac Newton was the first to come up with the idea that all objects are attracted towards each other
by gravity. Even people are attracted towards each other by gravity, but this force is so small that it is
not noticeable. Gravity only becomes noticeable if one (or both) of the objects has a lot of mass, such
as the Earth. Close to the Earth at an altitude of 100 km, a satellite needs to be moving at 8 kilometres
per second (28 000 km/h) to stay in orbit. The Moon is 360,000 km from the Earth and only needs to be
travelling at 1 km/s to stay in orbit around the Earth.


There is gravity in space



Earth-Moon system and gravity
Any two masses are attracted towards each other by gravity. This force of gravity causes
the Moon to change direction to make it orbit around the Earth.


Gravity doesn’t disappear just because you are above the atmosphere. Even if an object is high above
the Earth’s atmosphere, there will still be a strong force of gravity pulling it towards the centre of the
Earth. At an altitude of 30 km, you would be above 99% of the Earth’s atmosphere. At 100 km, you
would officially be in space, yet the weight force of gravity would still be nearly the same.
You and the Earth would still be pulled together.


Isaac Newton worked out that, if the distance from the centre of the Earth doubles,
gravity becomes a quarter as much as it was on the surface.
A satellite with a mass of 1000 kg has a weight force of 9800 N at the Earth’s surface.
The radius of the Earth is about 6366 km, so at 6366 km above the Earth’s surface,
the distance from the centre of the Earth will have doubled.
The weight force pulling it towards the centre of the Earth will now only be a quarter as much
but will still be 2450 N.


So why doesn’t a 1000 kg satellite just fall back to Earth?


Sideways speed keeps satellites in orbit.

As a satellite moves around the Earth in a circular orbit, the direction of the force
of gravity is always towards the centre of the Earth.
At an altitude of 100 km, you would be so high that you would see black sky and stars
if you looked upwards. If you took a satellite to this height and released it, it would still fall towards
the Earth because the force of gravity is nearly the same as it is at the Earth’s surface.


However, if the satellite is given speed in any direction horizontal to the surface of the Earth,
it will travel further before it hits the Earth. If it is given enough speed, it will travel so far that,
as it curves towards the Earth, it will miss the Earth altogether.
At just the right speed, it will move around the Earth in a circular motion.
This type of motion and the path that a satellite moves in is called an orbit.


Close to the Earth at an altitude of 100 km, a satellite needs to be
moving at 8 kilometres per second (28 000 km/h) to stay in orbit. At higher altitudes, satellites
do not need to be travelling as fast. Television communication satellites are at a higher altitude
of 36 000 km and only need to travel at 3 km/s (11,000 km/h).


The Moon is 360,000 km from the Earth and only needs to be travelling at 1 km/s to stay in
orbit around the Earth.


If there is gravity in space, why do astronauts appear weightless?
Astronauts appear to be weightless for the same reason that a person on a trampoline
feels weightless when in the air. There is still the same amount of gravity acting, but there is
no floor pushing upwards on the astronaut, so the weight force cannot be felt.


If a person was in an elevator and the cables broke and the brakes failed (we are assured this
cannot happen), the person and the elevator would fall towards the Earth at the same rate.
The floor would not be holding the person upwards, so the person could enjoy the sensation of
weightlessness (for a brief while).


This is the same for astronauts high above the atmosphere on the International Space Station
(ISS) at an altitude of about 400 km. Gravity is still strong, but the astronaut and the ISS fall towards
the ground at the same rate. They are also both travelling horizontally at 28,000 km/h.
As they fall towards the ground, they travel so fast horizontally that they miss the Earth
altogether and orbit the Earth once every 90 minutes.

Nature of science

Science ideas change over time. Isaac Newton’s gravity-based world view has since been
superseded by Albert Einstein’s ideas that all masses distort space and time.
This highlights the fact that science is not a fixed body of knowledge. Although
Einstein’s theory is widely accepted, Newton’s law of universal gravitation is still used for
practical situations such as satellite motion.


Measuring Perimeter

We will have met the success criteria when we

  • Can show that we have accurately calculated perimeters of 2D / 3D shapes.


Measurement Scavenger Hunt
You may work on your own or with a buddy.  
You need photographic evidence of your recorded measurements.
Find an object that is exactly 1 cm long
staple

Find an object that has an area of
20 cm²
5cm by 4cm
Find an object that has a perimeter of approximately 10 cms

There is a plus or minus of 1.5 cms
2.5cm by 2.5cm
Find an object that has an area larger than
10 metres²
A third of the court
Find an object that is 4cm wide

Create two different shapes that each have an area of 24cm²
5cm by 7cm
10cm by 2cm
Locate an item that is ⅓  of a metre high.
33cm concrete slab by fence  
Find an object with a perimeter of 1 metre

Chromebook
Measure the length of the tallest girl or boy in the class and compare this to the length of the shortest (currently) girl or boy in the class.

Nyah 167cm tall
Cullam 138 cm


Find an object that has a perimeter
of 1 metre
A4 piece of paper


Record your information onto a table on a document.  Insert your photographs into the table to support your recordings.

You have 45 minutes to complete the scavenger hunt and to present your information.



Thursday, 7 June 2018

Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Wednesday, 4 April 2018